This website is a  SAMBROOK Family Genealogy website dedicated to the origins of the Sambrook family.Created by Ian Sambrook, currently living in Gisborne New Zealand
SAMBROOK.INFO
You can contact Ian at
iansambrook@xtra.co.nz
You are now on the Bradford Hundred Page of
Bradford, the 'broad ford' (mentioned in the 1140s) from which Shropshire's most extensive hundred took its name, lies within the manor and parish of Ercall Magna where the road from High Ercall to Shrewsbury crosses the river Roden.  Bradford bridge apparently remained the meeting place of the hundred court until the early 17th century.

Bradford hundred was formed by an amalgamation of the Domesday hundreds of Hodnet and Wrockwardine, respectively the north and north-western and the south and south-eastern parts of the resulting hundred. The suggestion that Wrockwardine hundred was conterminous with an ancient British area called Ercall  must contend with the likelihood that the hundred boundaries of Domesday Shropshire were little more than a century old.

The estates forming Wrockwardine hundred amounted to 173 5/12 hides in 1086, those forming Hodnet amounted to 967/8. In 1086 the caput of each hundred was the manor after which it was named. Before the Conquest both manors had been held by King Edward the Confessor; in Wrockwardine, and doubtless in Hodnet too, Earl Edwin had received the 'third penny' from the hundred profits. By 1086 both manors, with all the hundred profits, belonged to Roger, earl of Shrewsbury, and they escheated to the Crown in 1102 after the rebellion of his son Earl Robert.

Berwick Maviston, Eaton Constantine, Child's Ercall (incl. Hungryhatton and the Lees), Hadley, High Hatton, ½ Haughton, Hopton and Espley, Leighton (incl. Garmston), Preston Boats, Rodington (incl. Somerwood), Stanton upon Hine Heath (incl. Roden and Rodenhurst), Sugdon, ½ Withington, Gt. Wytheford (incl. Edgebolton and Muckleton), and ½ L. Wytheford.
123. Chetwynd (incl. Bearstone), Howle, Moreton Corbet, Puleston,
Sambrook (incl. Ellerton), Stockton, and until some time between 1255 and 1285 ½ Lawley.

3.2.4. Cheswardine, containing the townships of

3.2.4.1. Cheswardine,
3.2.4.2. Chippenhall,
3.2.4.3. Ellerton,
3.2.4.4. Sambrook,
3.2.4.5. Soudley,
3.2.4.6. Goldstone.

CHESWARDINE, Shropshire

"CHESWARDINE, a parish in the hundred of North Bradford, in the county of Salop, 4 miles S.E. of Market Drayton, and 10 N.W. of the Norton Bridge railway station. It is situated near the Liverpool and Birmingham canal. The living is a vicarage* in the diocese of Lichfield, value £245, in the patronage of E. W. Harding, Esq. The church, dedicated to St. Swithin, was rebuilt, with the exception of the tower, in 1809; it is a stone edifice in the pointed style. Here are free schools for both sexes. The charities, which are chiefly used for purchasing corn for the poor, amount to £87, and there is an endowment of £21 left for repairing the church."
"CHIPNALL, a township in the parish of Cheswardine, in the county of Salop, 4 miles S.E. of Market Drayton."

"GOLDSTONE, a township in the parish of Cheswardine, hundred of North Bradford, county Salop, 1 mile S.W. of the village of Cheswardine, and 4 S.E. of Market Drayton."

"SAMBROOK, a township in the parish of Cheswardine, county Salop, 4 miles N.W. of Newport."

"SOWDLEY, a township in the parish of Cheswardine, county Salop, 6 miles N.W. of Newport, near the Grand Junction canal."

CHETWYND, Shropshire

"CHETWYND, a parish in the hundred of South Bradford, in the county of Salop, 2 miles N.W. of Newport, its post and railway town: It is situated on the river Meis, and contains the townships of Howlo, Picksick, and Sambrooki. The living is a rectory* in the diocese of Lichfield, value £705, in the patronage of J. C. B. Borough, Esq. The church, dedicated to St. Michael, is a brick edifice. Here the Independents have a place of worship. There is a free school. The charities produce about £46 per annum. J. C. B. Borough, Esq., is lord of the manor. Chitwynd Park contains a substantially built mansion, and is well stocked with deer."
"HOWLE, a township in the parish of Chetwynd, county Salop, 4 miles N.W. of Newport. It is situated on the river Mees."

"PICKSTOCK, a township in the parishes of Chetwynd and Edgmond, county Salop, 3 miles N.W. of Newport. It is situated on the river Mees, near Pickstock Grange."

"SAMBROOK, a township in the parish of Chetwynd, county Salop, 3 miles N.W. of Newport. The living is a perpetual curacy* in the diocese of Lichfield, value £165."
Shropshire
See also: History of Shropshire § Hundreds

Domesday Book

From Open Domesday
Alnodestreu, Baschurch, Conditre, Condover, Culvestan, Hodnet, Leintwardine, Merset, Overs, Patton, Reweset, Rinlau
Shrewsbury, Wittery, Wrockwardine,

Post-Domesday
The hundreds of Shropshire were greatly reformed during the 12th century.
Bradford (North & South divisions), Brimstree†, Chirbury, Clun, Condover, Ford, Munslow (Upper & Lower divisions)
Oswestry, Overs (in two detached parts), Pimhil, Purslow, Shrewsbury, Stottesdon, Wenlock,
- including the Shropshire exclave of Halesowen, The liberties of the borough of Shrewsbury and priory/borough of Wenlock
were extensive and are usually considered as hundreds (Wenlock's sometimes described as the "franchise of Wenlock").
Map of Shropshire; by Wenceslaus Hollar (17th century).
This map shows the county of Shropshire with its hundreds in the early 1800s.