This website is a  SAMBROOK Family Genealogy website dedicated to the origins of the Sambrook family.Created by Ian Sambrook, currently living in Gisborne New Zealand
SAMBROOK.INFO
You can contact Ian at
iansambrook@xtra.co.nz

IMPORTANT HISTORIC DATES LINKED TO THE
NAME OF SAMBROOK AND ALSO THE PARISH OF SAMBROOK

1085-86 The Name SAMBROOK or derivative thereofidentified in The DOMESDAY BOOK
Identified as SEMBRA, ( compiled in 1085-86 by William the Conqueror ).
1262 The Manor of ELLERTON became a member of CHETWYND.
1271 Village of SEMBRA changes name to SAMBROK.
1272 Village of SAMBROK changes name to de SAMBRO.
1272 Dury duty for ROGER WALDYNG de SAMBRAon “The BRADFORD “ Hundred atthe Assizes Court.
1272 A writ served by ROGER WALDYNG de SAMBRA on RALPH de BOLYER andWILLIAM de TYTTENCLEGH regarding the ownership of certain SAMBROOKTenements.
1278 Dury duty for ROGER WALDYNG de SAMBRA at WOODCOTE.
1284 Dury duty for ROGER WALDYNG de SAMBRA at HODNET.
1284 Village of de SAMBRO changes name to SAMBROK derived from theSandstone and the SHOWELL BROOK.
1285 Dury duty for ROGER WALDYNG de SAMBRA at WELLINGTON.
1285 ROGER WALDYNG de SAMBRA named as Regarder of :The Kings Forest”.December of that year.
1563 Village of SAMBROK changes name to SOMBROKE.
1569 WILLIAM SAMBROOK’S name appears on the “Bradford Hundred” list.
1584 WILLIAM SAMBROOK’S name appears on the "Bradford Hundred” list.
1588 WYLLYA SAMBROOK becomes Church Warden.
1589 Village of SOMBROKE changes name to SANDBROCK.
1623 The publication “The Visitations of Shropshire” verifies the name SAMBROOKwith 13 others as on the “Bradford Hundred”.
1625 - 1697 FRANCIS SAMBROOK and RICHARD FORD build SAMBROOKFORGEand MILL.
1635 THOMAS SANDBROOK emmigrates to Boston Mass,USA.
1660 JOHN SAMBROOKE emmigrates to Barbados.
1672 THE HEARTH TAX ROLL contains 11 SAMBROOK’S registered aspaying Tax.Some are listed here,
Mr WILLIAM SAMBROOK of PICKSTOCK,
Mr GEORGE SAMBROOK of PICKSTOCK,
Mr FRANCIS SAMBROOK of SAMBROOK,
Mr WILLIAM SAMBROOK of SAMBROOK.
1672 SAMBROOK HALL is occupied by FRANCIS SAMBROOK.
1677 JOHN ENGLISH and ELIZABETH SAMBROOK are Married in Canterbury.
1678 WILLIAM SAMBROOK Son of GEORGE and ELLEN SAMBROOK is Baptised atEDGMOND Church.
1681 ANNE SAMBROOK Daughter of GEORGE and ELLEN SAMBROOK is Baptisedat EDGMOND Church.
1691 Dury duty for HENRY de SAMBROOK ..
1696 FRANCIS SAMBROOK dies.
1700 Bridge at STANFORD built.
1702 GEORGE SAMBROOK sells land to OBADIAH ADAMS who’s Grandmother was ELLEN JERVIS of “THE HILL”, CHESWARDINE, now CHESWARDINE HALL.
1702 SAMBROOK MANOR built by OBADIAH and FRANCES ADAMS, FRANCES wasDaughter and Heiress of FRANCIS SAMBROOK of SAMBROOK
1715 SIR SAMUEL VANAKER SAMBROOKE marries Elizabeth Wyndam of Cromer.
1722 Village of SANDBROCK changes name to SAMBROOK.
1722 SAMBROOK HALL is occupied by GRIFFITH SPENDER.
1732 SLADE’S MILL, SHOWELL still in active use.
1741 “THE GRANGE” built by RICHARD FORMSTONE.
1741 “MOWCOP FARM” built by RICHARD FORMSTONE
1742 GEORGE SAMBROOKE and HANNAH PURKES are Married in St Georges ChapelMayfair.
1773 GEORGE ADAMS changes his name to GEORGE ANSON.

1758 RICHARD FORD is declared Bankrupt.
1778 PICKSTOCK GRANGE WORKHOUSE built, lived in by THOMAS and JANET TURNER.
1778 SHOWELL POOL MILL built by THOMAS KYNNERSLEY.
1782 SLADE’S FARM, SHOWELL occupied by the WRIGHT Family.
1789 ELLERTON PAPER MILL burns down.
1795 ELLERTON CORN MILL built.
1800 SHOWELL FOUNDRY built by JOHN HAZELDINE, first Passenger Train built.
1800 Profitable eel catching business established.
1800 Village now has two Blacksmiths, a Tailor, a Baker and Bakery.
1800Village Mason arrives, name of BEDDALL.
1819 The FIRST EARL of LICHFIELD sells SAMBROOK MANOR to WILLIAM MINORofEDGMOND.
1836 ELLERTON HALL built by Mr ROBERT MASEFIELD.
1837 DEEPDALE FARM built.
1839 Small CHAPEL built in SAMBROOK, opposite the village green but neverconsecrated, Resident Curate was Rev. HOUGHTON.
1840 SHOWELL GRANGE built by the WRIGHT Family.
1850 Church Building Committee formed.
1851 SHOWELL POOL MILL enlarged byTHOMAS KYNNERSLY-GARDENER.
1856 October 2nd, “ CHURCH OF ST LUKE”, consecrated by Lord Bishop of LICHFIELD.
1856 December 29th, SAMBROOK becomes a Member of the Parishes ofEDGMOND, CHETWYND and CHESWARDINE.
1856 JOJN SAMBROOK becomes village Shoemaker.
1856 JOHN SAMBROOK becomes village Dyer.
1856 SHOWELL BROOK BRIDGE “KEYSTONE” laid by Mr R. HAZELDINE.
1856 MARY SAMBROOK of PICKSTOCK age 90 years, first Burial in Church Grounds
1857 SAMBROOK SCHOOL and SCHOOL HOUSE completed.
1857 The London Gazette publishes the VILLAGEOF SAMBROOK EcclesiasticalBoundary.
1858 SAMBROOK GALA DAY Sept 9th.
1858 Mr BEVAN church builder dies.
1860 DEEPDALE FARM enlarged
1860 CHAPEL demolished, A Cruck Cottage is built in its place using original Chapelbricks.
1860 Methodist Church built in HOWLE.
1877 JUBILEE PORCH built onto “ CHURCH OF ST LUKE”, to celebrate QueenVictoria’sJubilee.
1880 Council School opened.
1897 First POST OFFICE opened.
1906 ELLERTON HALL sold to Colonel Lawrence.
1920 MR T.C. WARD donates land for playing fields and Institute.
1926 First TELEPHONE EXCHANGE opened, with 8 subscribers.
1930 CATTLE POUND removed.
1938Air Ministry fills in the “SHIP PIT”.
1953 “CHURCH OF ST LUKE”, Organ moved from the Chancel to the NorthAisle.
1954 Telephone Exchange now has 90 subscribers.
1954“A SHORT STORY ABOUT SAMBROOK PARISH”Written by Miss Mabel Wheatpublished by “The Advertiser Printing Works” Newport, Shropshire. The ForwardWritten by ROBERT L. HODSON, Bishop Suffragan of Shrewsbury, EdgmondRectory, Newport, Shropshire.
1956 SAMBROOK CHURCH October 2nd, “ CHURCH OF ST LUKE”, celebratesCentenary.
1956 August Birthday of Ian Sambrook - originator of this website
You are now on the History Page of

SAMBROOK

The English name of SAMBROOK is of local origin. Local surnames were derived from the place where a person once lived, or a prominent local geographical feature,perhaps a hill identified one person from another who lived near abridge, river, lake, town, etc. Many of these names were preceded by a preposition such as 'de', 'at', 'by', 'in', or 'of'. These tended to lapse in later years.

In this instance, the name denotes ' of SAMBROCK ', a parish in the diocese of LICHFIELD, and the original bearer of this name would have come from this place. The ancient chronicles of England reveal the early records of the name of SAMBROOK as a Norman surname which ranks as one of the oldest.
The history of the name is closely interwoven within the majestic tapestry as an intrinsic part of the history of Britain. Some times mistakenly assumed as of French origin, being more accurately of Viking origin.

It is often also assumed that surnames were adopted by the user, when in fact few were, as no need existed for the individual to distinguish himself from his peers. Names were used mainly to assist in the ready identification of a person for the purposes of Tax payment, Church records, Transfer of land, Military service and any official documentation.

In-depth research by skilled analysts into ancient manuscripts such as:

The Domesday Book ( compiled in 1085-86 by William the Conqueror ),
The Ragman Rolls, The Hundred Rolls, The Wace Poem,
The Honour Roll of the Battel Abbey, The Curia Regis, Pipe Rolls,
The Falaise Roll, Tax records, Baptismals, Family genealogies,
Local Parish and Church records,
shows the first record of the name of SAMBROOK was found in SHROPSHIRE where they were anciently seated as" Lords of the Manor " of the Manor of SAMBROOK in that Shire.

Early records also show that SAMBROOK or its variants include Henry de SAMBRUGG and John de SAMBRUGG, both of county Oxford who are recorded within the Hundred Rolls, which until the 19th century was a unit of English Government detailing citizens of a given area.This system of local legal jurisdiction was introduced by King Edmund I( 939 - 46AD ).
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At a later date Simon de SAMBRIGG, of County Surrey is noted in the records of Edward 1st. Later records show the marriage of John ENGLISH and Elizabeth SAMBROOKE is recorded in Canterbury in the year 1677 AD and the marriage of George SAMBROOKE and Hannah PURKES took place in St George's chapel, Mayfair in 1742.

Many alternate spellings were found in the archives researched, typically linked to a common root, usually to one of the Norman nobles at the Battle of HASTINGS in 1066 AD. Although the name SAMBROOK appears in many references, from time to time the surname included such variations as:
SEMEMBRE, SAMBROOK, SAMBROOKE, SEMBRA, SAMBROK,
SEMBROOK, SEMBROOKE, SANBROOK, SAMBRO, SAMBROKE,
SANBROOKE, SANDBROOK, SANDBROOKE,SANDBROCK,
SAMBRIDGE, SAMBRUGG, SAMBROCK,SAMBRIGG,
and these changes in spelling frequently occurred, even between father and son.

Scribes recorded and spelled the name as it sounded. Typically a person would be born with one spelling, married with another, and buried with a headstone which showed another.

The surname SAMBROOK emerged as a notable family name, the uneventful middle ages was followed by the acquisition of a town house in London about the 17th century. Here at Bushill in Middlesex, the Sambrook Family achieved a baronetcy which ended in extinction in 1754.


Being loyalist and loyal to the crown of King Charles Ist , Sir Samuel Vanaker SAMBROOKE succeeded Sir Jeremy and Lady Judith SAMBROOKE ( 1650 ) and married Elizabeth Wyndam of Cromer about 1715.

Active in local politics and the affairs of England and Scotland during the 11th and 12th centuries brought about the movement of some family members to Scotland.

During the following 100 to 150 years many descendants emigrated across the Atlantic to the New World, to the Americas and Australasia.

John SAMBROOKE settled in Barbados in 1660, Thomas SANDBROOKE settled in Boston Mass. in 1635.There were many notable immigrants to Canada Known as the United Empire Loyalists, Gordon Hartley SAMBROOK settled in Canada and was the Company Director, Managing Director of Personnel and Social and Regional Policy, British Steel Corporation, London.
SAMBROOK VILLAGE
ECCLESIASTICAL BOUNDARY
(Taken from The London Gazette JAN 13th 1857)

The Boundary starts at the footbridge under DEEPDALE and follows the MEECE, crossing over SHOWELL BROOK, nearly to PULESON.

Here it turns and follows a small brook up to the PULESON FARM Fields to FLASHBROOK WOODS , through the woods across the farm house lane and a field to FLASHBROOK cross roads. It now turns up the road past the CAMP FARM to a small lane leading to ELLERTON.

It follows this lane as far as the ROUND LODGE, (Links Common). Here it turns North for a short way along a water course then West to the back of ELLERTON HALL again turning down the road to the old ELLERTON MILL. It turns here for SAMBROOK and crosses the fields, taking in the MILL HOUSE and the FORGE POOL to LONGPOOLS LANE. About a hundred yards along it the boundary then goes a short way up the lane, crosses a field on the SAMBROOK MANOR FARM to a point on the CROSS HILL LANE, from here up the CROSS HILL LANE to the main CHESTER ROAD.

It then crosses this and up BUTTERMILK HILL and across the fields above THE HOOKS , HINSTOCK. Again it turns below HILL WICKET FARM on the CHILDS ERCALL side, then down the road to the cross roads in ERCALL WOODS, and still on by the lane to the RED HOUSE, HOWLE.

Here it turns and goes a short way along the road to TIBBERTON, then turns to NEW CAYNTON taking in a few fields there on the TIBBERTON side of the NEW CAYNTON ROAD. It then follows the MEECE as far as STANFORD BRIDGE,and from there it follows the CHESTER ROAD to NEWPORT, taking in the CHAIN GATE COTTAGE then to DEEPDALE FARM. It now follows this road past the farm and finishes as it began at the footbridge over the MEECE.The RURAL Boundary is the same except it leaves out ELLERTON.
A stone on the ELLERTON / SAMBROOK ROAD marks the corner of theRURAL Boundary.
Being the originator of this Family Tree I feel that I should elaborate a little on the ORIGINS of the SAMBROOK Name.

The information is gleaned from both information obtained from people hawking Genealogy information at Porirua Plaza Wellington, New Zealand, in March 1993 and obtained by Ian Sambrook.

The second scroll was obtained from a similar source by Jean and Joe Sambrook when last in the UK in August of 1994. I have taken some license in combining the two scrolls and believe that this is a fair representation.
Gravestone Photographic Resource - to be explored at later date